Asbestos Gallery

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Asbestos containing tunnel ring caulking normally contains Amosite (brown) or Chrysotile (white) asbestos and was used as a barrier to fill the gap between tunnel ring sections and to stop water ingress.

 

In the photo to the left you can see a white substance that forms a cross in the middle of the photo. This is the asbestos tunnel ring caulking.

 

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Asbestos containing Cellactite sheeting is metallic corrugated sheeting with a bituminous coating that normally contains Chrysotile (white) asbestos. Cellactite sheeting was used as drainage whereby any water ingress from the tunnel ring joins would drain off down the back of the Cellactite sheeting panels which were overlapping.

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Asbestos containing braided cabling normally contains Chrysotile (white) asbestos and was used to protect the cable it housed from fire and to offer additional insulation from other nearby electrical services.

 

If you look at the photo to the left the asbestos braided cable sits in between the metal conduit and disappears into the wall behind the electrical box.

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Asbestos containing asbestos cable troughing normally contains Chrysotile (white) asbestos but can also contain Crocidolite (blue) asbestos. This cementitious material was used to house and protect electrical cabling and was normally set in concrete. Asbestos was added to the cement mix as a bonding agent.

 

If you look closely at the middle of the photo to the left you can see a piece of redundant asbestos containing cable troughing exiting from under the running rails. This probably would have once fed a cable tray.

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Asbestos containing piping normally contains Chrysotile (white) asbestos but can also contain Crocidolite (blue) asbestos. This cementitious material has many uses such as soil stacks, rain water pipes and general water pipes. Asbestos was added to the cement mix as a bonding agent.

 

If you look closely at the middle of the photo to the left you can see a section of asbestos containing piping that has been uncovered during building works. Asbestos piping has been known to house numerous services, not just water.

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Asbestos containing gaskets to metallic ducting normally contain Chrysotile (white) asbestos. The gaskets were used extensively when joining the metalic sections together. The metallic sections were normally bolted through the gasket to create a tight seal.

 

If you look at the bottom right hand corner of the photo to the left you can see two joined vertical sections of metallic ducting. Situated in between these sections is an asbestos containing gasket. Note that asbestos was also commonly used as putty, sealing and mastic agents.

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Asbestos containing shuttering normally contains Chrysotile (white) or Amosite (brown) asbestos. Extreme care should be taken as the material can be in the form of asbestos insulation board. Contact us for more information.

 

Asbestos containing shuttering was used extensively to contain concrete during pours and is often located in and around building foundations, concrete beams and poured concrete floors.

 

If you look at the picture to the left, asbestos containing shuttering has been used in the construction of a manhole to an underground duct.

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Asbestos rope seal gaskets normally contain Chrysotile (white) asbestos and were commonly used within boilers as packing where metal sections were joined together. Asbestos rope seal gaskets can often be seen on the front of boilers where the housing meets the intake services. You can normally gauge if a boiler contains asbestos if you know the age of the boiler. Another tip is to 'Google' the make and model.

 

If you look closely at the photo to the left you can clearly see the asbestos rope seal gasket in the middle and above.

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Asbestos containing cold water storage tanks normally Chrysotile (white) asbestos but can also contain Crocidolite (blue) asbestos. This cementitious material was used to house water extensively in domestic and commercial dwellings. Asbestos was added to the cement mix as a bonding agent.

 

The left hand photo shows an asbestos containing cold water storage tank resting on rafters in a roofspace.

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Asbestos containing roof sheeting and capping panels normally contain Chrysotile (white) asbestos but can also contain Crocidolite (blue) asbestos.  Asbestos was added to the cement mix as a bonding agent. The material is commonly found on garage roofs.

 

The photo to the left shows asbestos roof sheeting on an out building.

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Asbestos pipe insulation normally contains Chrysotile (white) asbestos and Amosite (brown) asbestos. Asbestos lagging generally exists in 2 forms. Hand applied 'hardset' applied to pipes / elbows and pre-formed 'sectional' pipe insulation.

 

Where 'hardset' insulation was applied it is not uncommon to find debris to wall and floor surfaces. Asbestos can become friable where asbestos containing pipe insulation is in poor condition.

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Asbestos containing sprayed insulation normally contains Crocidolite (blue) asbestos. Its trade name is 'flock'. Flock was used extensively as fire protection, applied by spray to ceilings, beams, steel work and lift shafts.

 

Sprayed asbestos insulation has a high chance of becoming friable if left in poor condition.

 

The photo to the left shows encapsulated sprayed insulation applied to structural steel work.